August 19, 2017, 10:53:29 PM

Author Topic: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense  (Read 25628 times)

Offline hillbillytowing

  • Survivalist
  • ********
  • Posts: 2767
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #160 on: October 14, 2010, 12:23:05 PM »
That's some excellent advice there annt sugesstions as to where I can get gun smith training and where I can get information on recalled fire arms
I may act civilized, but that's just it, an act. Scratch the surface, you find a predator, harm those under my protection, it will be better to face your worst nightmare.

Offline MtnMan

  • Scout
  • ***
  • Posts: 266
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #161 on: October 14, 2010, 12:34:22 PM »
That's some excellent advice there annt sugesstions as to where I can get gun smith training and where I can get information on recalled fire arms
Manufacturer's web sites will have a recall tab in most cases - you can get a book on gunsmithing from a public library, also a great place for Used Firearms Digest to check prices (and sometimes problems) on older guns. 

Chuck Hawks has a decent piece entitled "Buying a Used Handgun" which is on the free, non-subscriber portion of www.chuckhawks.com - I'll say here I don't agree with everything Chuck says about firearms, but his is an informed opinion based on years of experience, and his used guide is good enough to go by for most purchases.
"The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation...but it is a characteristic of wisdom to not do desperate things"
-Henry David Thoreau

Offline hillbillytowing

  • Survivalist
  • ********
  • Posts: 2767
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #162 on: October 14, 2010, 02:34:59 PM »
Thank you ill check him out

I may act civilized, but that's just it, an act. Scratch the surface, you find a predator, harm those under my protection, it will be better to face your worst nightmare.

Offline KentuckyWoodsman

  • Administrator
  • Survivalist
  • *********
  • Posts: 3918
  • Keeping a low profile
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #163 on: October 14, 2010, 03:24:43 PM »
Well I got to shoot KBs LCR/LCP today and have got to say I am impressed with there performance. I guess only time and use will tell the tell of any problems.
It is not the strong, but the responsive that survive.

“Everyone should believe in something; I believe I’ll go fishing.” –Henry David Thoreau

Offline Kentucky Bob

  • Man Cave Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • ******
  • Posts: 8131
  • Will work for ammo...
    • 103.9 The Bulldog
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #164 on: October 15, 2010, 08:53:34 PM »
Tips for buying a used gun would be enough to fill an entire thread, lots of info out there!  There are a lot of great buys to be had out there if you know what to look for.  For instance, on a revolver you have to do a lot of things but first check to see if the gun is loaded.

You've got to get over your first impressions when you see the gun's finish.  A gun with a pristine finish may be a gutted wreck, or the gun that looks like 20 miles of bad road may shoot like a house on fire.  The outward appearance may give some indication of how well the gun was maintained, or it could just show honest holster wear.  On a gun (of any type--rifle, shotgun, pistol) with adjustable sights you should look for burred out screws, loose fit, damage to the sights, etc.  Look at the grips, the muzzle's crown, trigger, cylinder latch and any other external features.  One red flag I always look for is a "burred" or damaged screw head on the gun's frame.  This means that someone has been taking the gun apart--usually with the wrong size screwdriver--and doing who knows what to the guns internal parts.  A 'shade tree' gun smith may have been monkeying around in there.

Next, look at the cylinder crane where it fits against the frame while the cylinder is closed.  If there is a gap it probably means the previous owner watched way too many movies in which an actor dramatically 'flicks' or 'snaps' the cylinder shut with a flick of the wrist.  I personally detest seeing this behavior and it's pure-dee ignorance.  This can warp the crane (the part that supports the cylinder when the gun is open) and cause the cylinder's chambers not to align with the bore properly.  If the crane fit looks tight, it's time to move to the interior.  Open the cylinder, note the movement of the cylinder latch.  You want a smooth release, but you don't want the cylinder to just flop out.  There are several designs for keeping a revolver cylinder in place and if they're worn or damaged the cylinder may not held securely.  Try the ejector rod and extractor...if they're bent or damaged they'll have to be repaired.  Look at the chambers for pitting or other damage.  While the cylinder is open check the bore as well.  Look for pitting (rust spots that have eaten into the metal) and 'bulges.'  A barrel bulge indicates that the gun was fired with an obstruction in the barrel, usually a bullet from a 'squib' or underpowered load that didn't entirely leave the barrel.

Close the cylinder and check to see if it locks up firmly.  Don't look for just rotational play, clockwise or counter clockwise, but look for front-to-back movement as well.  Next it's time to try the action.  Hold the cylinder with light pressure between the thumb and forefinger of the left hand while you pull back the hammer with the right.  When the hammer reaches it's fully rearward position the cylinder should align a chamber with the bore despite the light pressure you applied.  Now with some models the cylinder will not lock entirely until the trigger is pulled--especially in older Colt revolvers.  Holding the hammer to prevent it from falling forward, pull the trigger and ease the hammer down.  If the action is "in time" the cylinder will align each chamber with the bore without trouble.  

Now, you need to check the hammer/sear engagement.  Sometimes the 'shade tree' gun smith will take it upon himself to "polish" or "hone" the contact surfaces between the innards of a gun to "smooth it out".  If not done correctly, the gun won't function safely.  So, this time cock the hammer back to full cock.  With the hammer back, try to push it forward with your thumb without touching the trigger.  If the hammer drops the innards have problems, time to pass on the gun.  On a double action revolver you should also take the time to try the DA action, placing gentle pressure on the cylinder to see if the gun locks up correctly in DA mode and just to try the overall "feel" for the DA trigger pull.  Personally, I'll pass on an 18lb trigger pull.

All that and I've only covered the bare basics of looking at a used revolver...lots more info to go, but it is out there on the 'net.  Just Google "how to buy a used ______"  fill in the blank--semi auto pistol, rifle, shotgun, etc. Here are some links about buying used guns from Chuck Hawks:

http://www.chuckhawks.com/used_handgun.htm

http://www.chuckhawks.com/used_rifle.htm

http://www.chuckhawks.com/used_shotgun.htm

"Eating and sleeping are the only activities that should be allowed to interrupt a man's enjoyment of his cigar." - Mark Twain    :cigar: 

"Searchin' for my lost shaker of salt..."

 www.1039thebulldog.com

Offline Freebirde

  • Master Scout
  • ****
  • Posts: 542
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #165 on: October 16, 2010, 12:45:36 PM »
These are not exactly beginners, but here's a little shooting video for you.

http://www.tnwildside.org/stories.asp?Keyword=&Guide=&Recipe=&Franchise=&Video=754
You will never achieve true personal greatness unless you hold yourself to a higher standard than you hold others.

With all the new and different mistakes out there waiting to be made, why keep repeating the old ones?

There is not enough time to make all the mistakes yourself, so learn from the mistakes of others.

Offline Swede

  • OWNER
  • Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • *********
  • Posts: 20968
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #166 on: February 15, 2011, 01:08:06 PM »
I just traded for a Remington 788  .243 in mint condition with a Bushnell Legend 5-15x40 Rifle Scope. Im not at all impressed with the bolt. Its not very smooth at all and there seems to be a problem with the handle breaking off as its welded on. Stats confirm its a very accurate rifle some think out performs the 700. There appears to be a cult following for this reason. It was out of production in 1983 I think. I see some complaints  with the safety and a few years back you could send the rifle back to the company and they would send back a 700 but I dont think there still doing that. Theres some complaint that the .243 rounds have an excessive muzzle blast because of the carbine length of the barrel. Im not sure if mine is the carbine style Ill do some more checking on it. Every .243 Ive ever shot have a huge muzzle blast. I got the sling and five boxes of shells with it.

I traded a Remington Model 7400 in 30.06 with a Tasco .40 MM scope that I traded for and never shot + I paid $200 and one box of factory shells. I dont know who got the better deal but thats a sign that it was a good trade.  :D The 788's were a lower cost rifle when they came out.
I hope the war on terror goes better then the war on drugs and the war on poverty
If you dont care where you are your never lost
Im a survivor not a victim
Its not who I am but what I do that defines me.

Offline Kentucky Bob

  • Man Cave Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • ******
  • Posts: 8131
  • Will work for ammo...
    • 103.9 The Bulldog
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #167 on: March 27, 2011, 07:11:26 AM »
Any updates on that 788, Swede? 
"Eating and sleeping are the only activities that should be allowed to interrupt a man's enjoyment of his cigar." - Mark Twain    :cigar: 

"Searchin' for my lost shaker of salt..."

 www.1039thebulldog.com

Offline Swede

  • OWNER
  • Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • *********
  • Posts: 20968
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #168 on: March 27, 2011, 09:58:36 AM »
The rifle is in mint condition but I had major complaints with the bolt action. It wasnt smooth at all as the 700 are. I had Swedesneighbor look at it and he discovered that the magazine plate was dragging on the bolt. It has a hinged receiver door. If you drop open the hinged door it smooths out a lot better. With live ammo in it works great.

I havent shot it yet. Ive got a bench at the farm but we have deer grazing by the barn daily,wild turkeys, a pair of Canadian geese, a pair of crows nesting at the pond and ducks on the pond and I really dont want that .243 muzzle blast disturbing them right now.   :scared:
I hope the war on terror goes better then the war on drugs and the war on poverty
If you dont care where you are your never lost
Im a survivor not a victim
Its not who I am but what I do that defines me.

Offline oldfatguy

  • Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • *********
  • Posts: 11253
  • ...an ever progressing polymathist.
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #169 on: March 27, 2011, 10:38:06 AM »
Sounds like quite the toy, Swede.  Personally, I would disturb the wildlife.

Remmington 788
OverviewOverview:
Description: Moderately priced, bolt action rifle commonly referred to as "Remington’s budget tackdriver".
Introduction Year: 1967
Year Discontinued: 1983   
Total Production: Approximately 565,000
Designer/Inventor: Wayne Leek
Action Type: Bolt action
   
Caliber/Gauge: .222 Rem. – 1967 – 1980, 1982
.223 Rem. – 1975
.22-250 Rem. – 1967
.243 Win. 1968; w/ 18 ½" barrel 1980
6mm. Rem. – 1969 – 1980
6mm. Rem. Left Hand – 1969 – 1980
7mm-08 Rem. – 1980 w/ 18 ½" barrel
.308 Win. – 1969
.308 Win. Left Hand – 1969 – 1980; w/ 18 ½" barrel 1980
.30-30 Win. – 1967 – 1970
.44 Rem. Mag. – 1967 – 1970
   
Serial Number Blocks: 1967 – 010001 to 068460
1968 – 6200000 to 6899999
1974 – A6000000 to A6199999
1978 – B6000000 to B6199999
   
Grades Offered: There were no high grades offered in this model.
   
Variations: In 1980 changes to the stock included a fluted comb, thicker pistol grip, and wider fore-end.
"If you truly love Nature, you will find beauty everywhere."  Vincent Van Gogh


Offline Kentucky Bob

  • Man Cave Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • ******
  • Posts: 8131
  • Will work for ammo...
    • 103.9 The Bulldog
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #170 on: March 28, 2011, 06:34:32 AM »
Swede, that sounds like the ones I've seen in the past.  Sounds like it will be a real working rifle for the farm.
"Eating and sleeping are the only activities that should be allowed to interrupt a man's enjoyment of his cigar." - Mark Twain    :cigar: 

"Searchin' for my lost shaker of salt..."

 www.1039thebulldog.com

Offline hillbillytowing

  • Survivalist
  • ********
  • Posts: 2767
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #171 on: January 04, 2012, 10:31:48 PM »
ok im looking for a sugetion of that calibers for handguns a new shooter shoiuld progress with starting at a .22 i was thinking of going to a .380 next oh and this is for my wife. she has no interest in shooting a rifle at this point and refuses to shoot a revolver because she findes them "ugly" im trying to convince her that beauty in a fire arm donse not matter reliability is what counts and comfort of shooting
I may act civilized, but that's just it, an act. Scratch the surface, you find a predator, harm those under my protection, it will be better to face your worst nightmare.

Offline Kentucky Bob

  • Man Cave Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • ******
  • Posts: 8131
  • Will work for ammo...
    • 103.9 The Bulldog
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #172 on: January 05, 2012, 05:34:11 AM »
Honestly, if you plan on stepping up from a .22 to a .380 you should be sure to do so in a larger handgun than some of the pocket guns like the LCP or Kel-Tec.  Those guns are great little guns, but they kick more than you might think and more than most novice shooters will like.  There are larger pistols chambered in .380 like the Beretta Cheetah and Browning BDA that are close in size to full-sized 9mm handguns.  Those are fairly pricey handguns, and Hi-Point offers a .380 pistol that's fair-sized.  I won't say it's a fantastic choice, but it is economical.  I think I read earlier that your wife has small hands, so get her to the gun shop to see what fits her.

A .38 Special loaded with just a nice light 148 grain wadcutter is just about the ideal load to step up to, but not starting out in a little five-shot snub-nose revolver.  Again, in a light revolver like that even a light .38 load will have some recoil that a new shooter may not like.  A full sized, four inch revolver is better to begin with.  This worked for my wife, who has now gotten used to pistols and has worked her way up to her own Ruger LCR.  However, if your wife is absolutely against a revolver that's going to take you back to either a larger .380 or a 9mm.  We've already been through a list of pistols that are available, so it will come down to what fits her hand the best and what fits your budget.
"Eating and sleeping are the only activities that should be allowed to interrupt a man's enjoyment of his cigar." - Mark Twain    :cigar: 

"Searchin' for my lost shaker of salt..."

 www.1039thebulldog.com

Offline hillbillytowing

  • Survivalist
  • ********
  • Posts: 2767
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #173 on: January 05, 2012, 10:38:01 AM »
Yah the no revolver with her makes it a little difficult. Anny thing from hear out small may kick to much andnscare her.... well.play it by ear
I may act civilized, but that's just it, an act. Scratch the surface, you find a predator, harm those under my protection, it will be better to face your worst nightmare.

Offline oldfatguy

  • Administrator
  • Survivorman
  • *********
  • Posts: 11253
  • ...an ever progressing polymathist.
Re: A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense
« Reply #174 on: January 05, 2012, 11:00:44 AM »
Practice, practice, practice...
"If you truly love Nature, you will find beauty everywhere."  Vincent Van Gogh